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15 Things to Remember During Recovery

15 Ways to Remember During Recovery

Our books are truly inspirational! We’ve rounded up 15 things to remember during recovery with help from our wonderful authors…

1. ‘Do please remember to treat yourself kindly…when things are difficult, or you don’t feel as if you are making quite as much progress as you would like, it is easy to blame yourself…but it is not your fault, nor is it a sign of weakness’ – Lauren Callaghan and Annemarie O’Connor, in Body Image Problems and Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Body Image

2. ‘Anxiety is what it is. Thoughts are just thoughts, nothing else. And we need these thoughts as humans, to learn, live and evolve…Face and embrace your fear and accept that sometimes you’ll feel bad, you will see how quickly its power shrinks’. – Adam Shaw, in OCD, Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Related Depression. The Definitive Survival and Recovery Approach

OCD, Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Related Depression. The Definitive Survival and Recovery Approach.

3. ‘I admit that talking to people is something that I have struggled with – and still struggle with at times – but identifying people in your life who can support you, people you can text to tell them you’re having a bad day, is so important. These are the people who will help you stay well’ – Hope Virgo, in Stand Tall Little Girl

Stand Tall Little Girl

4. ‘Identify your goals and make sure you stick to them. Write them down if you have to, put them in your wallet and never forget them.’ – Hope Virgo, in Stand Tall Little Girl

Stand Tall Little Girl

5. ‘Take small baby steps…push the boundaries throughout your recovery. It can even be quite exciting!’ – Hope Virgo, in Stand Tall Little Girl

Hope Virgo with her book

6. ‘Personal, creative or fun, find a purpose where you can manage your achievements – it will give you something to get out of bed for…Set your own deadlines and your own goals.’ – Terri Cox, in Shiny Happy Person

Shinny Happy Person

7. ‘While you need to take every care of yourself you can, sometimes a great way of making yourself feel better is to make someone else happy, and removing the spotlight in your mind from yourself to someone you love, or even a needy stranger.’ – Terri Cox, in Shiny Happy Person

Shiny Happy Person Audio

8. ‘There is no quick fix to curing anxiety, or any other mental illness. And taking a walk doesn’t magically fix it. But, as the supermarket ad says, every little helps.’ – Lucy Nichol, in A Series of Unfortunate Stereotypes

A Series of Unfortunate Stereotypes

9. ‘It’s vital to find someone who is willing to listen. And please don’t give up if your experiences are negative to begin with…eventually someone will listen to you. Someone will help you’ – Karen Manton, in Searching for Brighter Days

Searching for Brighter Days

10. ‘If I, myself, am not aware that something is going wrong, then no one else can help me. If I ignore any signs that my illness is creeping in, then it can have disastrous consequences…So, in this way, I am in control of my own mental health…now I can look out for my triggers and spot the warning signs. I can then deliberately change my pattern of thinking, and the environment around me, to make my mind work for me, not against me’. – Karen Manton, in Searching for Brighter Days

Searching for Brighter Days

11. ‘See it for what it really is: a mental health condition, a constant challenge, but not my present. And certainly not my future.’ – Paula McGuire, in Must Try Harder

Must Try Harder

12. ‘Reconnecting with the world, being outside among its wildest places and people, reminded me how very small my one human brain actually is. For far too long, it had been my everything: insulating me, surrounding me, and convincing me to believe all that it said. Keeping me in line, through fear and doubt, were anxiety’s chains, and to break them I had to start seeing things in context’. – Paula McGuire, in Must Try Harder

Must Try Harder

13. ‘Staying introspective can feed your depression, so I think it’s worthwhile to distract yourself, in a positive way, to help you through the hard times while you are recovering. This helps you get outside of your own head and focus on the world around you’. – Mark Edwards, in Life After Care

Life After Care

14. ‘When you redefine who you are in your own head, you can recognise that you are capable of moving on and moving past what has happened to you. You can decide that you want to get well and recognise that recovery is possible. And that’s how change begins to happen.’ – Mark Edwards, in Life After Care

Life After Care

15. ‘Don’t let the word “recovery” be hijacked by the powers that be. As soon as someone else defines your recovery, it stops being recovery.’ – Chris Young, in Walk A Mile

Walk A Mile

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